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Today is the opening of the 2nd Festival of Tolerance Rijeka. In Art-cinema Croatia, during the two days of the Festival, the audience in Rijeka will have the opportunity to see seven films selected from the Zagreb edition of the Festival.

Today’s program starts at 19.00 with the screening of the Croatian documentary film Some things shouldn’t be hidden, which will be presented in Rijeka just after its premiere in Zagreb. The film follows Nives Jagodić in her research about her grandfather Dr. Joza Jagodić, doctor in Bjelovar’s general hospital, who posthumously got the acknowledgement of “Righteous among the Nations”. Through her travels and conversation with the man whose life was saved by Dr. Joza Jagodić, we will find how much he risked throughout the whole WW2 in order to save civilians from certain death. His example will show us what makes people do something noble and righteous and even risk their own lives.

Right after that, we continue the program with the Broken Silence, documentary in which Roma radio reporter Orhan Galjus, born in Kosovo, along with filmmaker Bob Entrop, travels through Germany, Poland and Kosovo. They try to discover why the Sinti and Roma people kept silent about the genocide committed on their people. During the World War II, nearly half a million of them were murdered. Step by step, Orhan finds that this part of the history of the Sinti and Roma is hidden – as a kind of treasure. He fears that future generations will become alienated from their roots. What do these people – that for centuries lived in Europe – have to do to be taken seriously? Why do they deny their origin, as at the time Picasso and Charlie Chaplin did? What about the current generation of so-called “Gypsies”? Do they see the parallels between the persecution in history and exclusion and discrimination today? Does history repeat itself?

At 21.00, the official opening of the Festival will be held, during which the Festival Director Natasa Popovic will greet the audience. Today’s program will be concluded with The Jewish Cardinal, which has opened the Zagreb edition of the Festival. The Hollywood Reporter described it as “a fascinating tale told with uncommon depth and nuance”. The Independent stated it is “robust, sumptuously produced and impeccably cast!” The film is based on the true-life story of Jean-Marie Lustiger, who, born of Polish Jews, joined the Catholic priesthood and was appointed Archbishop of Paris. There, he openly celebrated his dual identity as a “Catholic Jew”, which brought him friends and enemies from both religions. Lustiger’s split allegiance is tested to the core when a group of Carmelite nuns decides to build a monastery on the edge of Auschwitz. Where will Lustiger stand?

Entrance to all the films is free of charge. We are looking forward to your arrival!